Bunnies, Bunnies, Everywhere… Hopping Around

I drove into the Pleasant Valley Campground near Tillamook, Oregon and there were bunnies everywhere, including this magnificent creature.

I drove into the Pleasant Valley Campground near Tillamook, Oregon and there were bunnies everywhere, including this magnificent creature.

I’ve been wandering around, playing nomad. Peggy was up in Alaska for a few weeks, helping out with grandkids, so I took off for a solo trip down the Oregon coast. She no more than returned and the two of us zipped down to the San Francisco Bay Area for a meeting of our book club. Now we are in Sedona, Arizona. Next up is Nashville. I’m feeling a bit country. Plus our daughter is expecting us for Christmas.

There is much to blog about, so much in fact that I don’t have a clue where to start. So I have decided to jump around, like a rabbit, which brings up this post on bunnies. Naturally.

On my Oregon coast trip, I stopped over in Tillamook to visit the cheese factory. It sends out tons of the stuff annually. I assume all over the world. I watched women whip around 50 pound blocks of cheese like they had been working out with Arnold Schwarzenegger. This made me hungry, so I ordered a sample plate of Tillamook Ice Cream. It’s really good. I mean really good. But eating all of those calories made me tired. It was time to find a campground.

This woman had just whipped around a 50 pound block of cheese like a child would a Lego. I would not get in an argument with her.

This woman had just whipped around a 50 pound block of cheese like a child would a Lego. I would not get into an argument with her.

And here we have the mass production of cheese. Let's see, at $7.00 per block, that's a lot of dollars.

And here we have the mass production of cheese. Let’s see, at $7.00 per small block, that’s a lot of dollars.

And this is where the bunnies come in. I pulled in to Pleasant Valley Campground a few miles south of Tillamook and was greeted by (drum roll please) RABBITS, dozens of them. There were black ones, and brown ones, and white ones, all of whom seemed to be chasing each other around in a glorious romp to make more bunnies. After all, isn’t that what rabbits do?

Ignoring the obvious, for the moment, I asked the owner where all the rabbits came from. “Oh they used to live across the street,” she informed me. “One day, a few moved over here. They didn’t do any harm and the campers seemed to like them. So I let them stay.” The rest is history, as they say. Anyway, here are some photos I took of the rabbits. Enjoy.

I am going for the awww factor with this baby bunny.

I am going for the “awww” factor with this baby bunny.

This was only a few of the rabbits, but it makes the point.

This was only a few of the rabbits, but it makes the point.

Furry rabbit near Tillamook, Oregon.

This furry fellow was napping when I sneaked up on him, but his eyes popped open…

Alert brown rabbit near Tillamook, Oregon.

And then he was all wiggly ears and twitchy nose.

It rained really hard that night. I discovered I had several rabbits using my van as shelter. The step is the doorstep to my van.

It rained hard that night. I discovered I had several rabbits using my van as shelter. The step is my doorstep. My flashlight caught their eyes. Scary. Was it a case of when good bunnies go bad?

Tillamook, Oregon Bunny. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

I’ll finish off with another baby bunny. It was cold out and this tyke looks cold. I almost invited it into my van to warm up. Next Blog: Will it be the crashing waves of the Pacific Ocean or the red cliffs of Sedona. Who knows?

 

 

36 comments on “Bunnies, Bunnies, Everywhere… Hopping Around

    • Large white rabbits make me think of Alice in Wonderland. 🙂 These rabbits had as much run as they wanted. But maybe freedom is just another way to run into something that wants to eat you, if you are a well fed rabbit. –Curt

  1. Bunnies are okay, I guess. Technically not rodents, but I think I’d want to keep a distance from an entire population (herd?) nonetheless. I’ve said it before, you and Peggy get around. Safe travels.

    • It’s rare, but on occasion the domestic type do go wild. I’ve seen them on several occasions over the years. What surprises me, as Bill and I talked about above, its that they seemed to thrive and survive predation. Did the myxomatosis wipe out the wild or domestic rabbits? –Curt

  2. Fascinating. Those are domesticated rabbits. I’m amazed that they are surviving. They would be easy prey for predators, it seems. Certainly they are pretty creatures. Glad they seem to be thriving there.

    • I was surprised by their survival as well, Bill. They looked quite well fed, from the grass, and they didn’t run very fast. The campground was rural enough to have predators around, including coyotes. I told Peggy I was surprised there weren’t fat coyotes around as well. –Curt

  3. They are so adorable! It’s amazing to see that many bunnies. The most I ever saw was in Wyoming once. But I wasn’t as good as you and missed most as I tried to shoot their portraits. Between Sedona and the Pacific waves, it’s a hard choice to make.

  4. After I lived in Vermont for a few years, I got cheese spoiled. Now my cheese standards are extremely high. I refuse to eat any other cheddar here in Portland than Tillamook, no matter how expensive it gets. ($9 for a 2lb block last week – yikes!) And you are right, the ice cream is delicious.

  5. Curt, the first thing I thought of when I saw your photos was the line from the movie “A Christmas Story” (my personal holiday favorite) “The old man can replace fuses quicker that a jack rabbit on a date.” Have a fun and decadent Thanksgiving! ~James

  6. What’s up, Doc?! 🐰

    We actually have a bunny explosion here in Orange County. They are all over the place with obviously not enough predators. California laws prohibit Elmer Fudd from stepping in California.

    And congratulations on your upcoming new arrival!!

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