Bryce Canyon and the Hoodoos… A Photographic Journey through America’s National Parks

Bryce Canyon photograph by Curtis Mekemson.

Bright colors combine with interesting rock formations to make Bryce Canyon.

There is nowhere in the world quite like Bryce Canyon. This is a place where you can let your imagination run as wild as it wants to run. I am always struck first by the colors of the rocks and then immediately afterwards by their shapes.

Thousands of years of ice-driven erosion have created a fantasy world of amphitheaters filled with hoodoos and other rock formations climbing down the side of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in Southern Utah.

The best way to experience the canyon is to hike down the trails but even a quick drive-through is rewarding. Early morning and evening are best times to catch the colors. Snow adds another dimension.

Bryce Canyon overlook. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

An overview of Bryce Canyon from one of the major overlooks.

Bryce Canyon Amphitheater. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

Bryce Canyon is actually not a canyon created by a river but is a series of amphitheaters dropping on of the Paunsaugunt Plateau.

Walls, Fins and hoodoos at Bryce Canyon. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

Hoodoos are stand alone rocks created by the process of erosion. A thick wall becomes a fin. Arches are created in the fin and then cave in, leaving hoodoo behind.

Hoodoo formation at Bryce Canyon. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

A close-up of hoodoo formation. The rock in the foreground is showing cracks and a small arch that will eventually fall in and form a hoodoo.

A hoodoo at Bryce Canyon National Park. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

A ghostly hoodoo.

More views of Bryce Canyon:

Bryce Canyon photo by Curtis Mekemson.

Bryce Canyon photo by Curtis Mekemson.

Bryce Canyon photograph by Curtis Mekemson.

NEXT BLOG: A visit to the Redwoods.

 

10 comments on “Bryce Canyon and the Hoodoos… A Photographic Journey through America’s National Parks

  1. I think I like the final photo the best. I like the “frosting” on top of the red rocks – so like Palo Duro and that area. There’s another place in far northwest Kansas I’d like to go – the chalk pyramids and monument rocks – also castle rock. They’re nothing like this, of course.

    Good tip about sunrise and sunset for the colors, too. It was amazing to see the prairie change from hour to hour. I’m sure changes in these rocks would be far more dramatic – not only because of the light, but because of the shifting shadows.

    • And morning light is substantially different than evening light. Being out and about in the early morning and late afternoon are my favorite times of day. Haven’t been to the chalk pyramids– Maybe next time I find myself driving across the country. –Curt

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