Dinosaur National Monument… A Photographic Journey through America’s National Parks

Dinosaur National Monument is filled with quiet beauty.

Dinosaur National Monument is filled with quiet beauty.

Located on the border between Colorado and Utah, Dinosaur National Monument is known for it’s large deposit of Dinosaur Bones. The Park also features a quiet beauty and an interesting collection of Native American petroglyphs. The Yampa and Green Rivers snake their way through the canyons of the park and attract white-water rafting enthusiasts– including several of my friends.

So there is a little bit of something for everyone in this little known National Monument.  Hopefully, this blog will encourage some of my readers to visit. You won’t regret the decision.

Asters in Dinosaur National Monument. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

Bright asters decorated the roadside on our way into camp.

Petroglyph at Dinosaur National Monument. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

This person with his/her large hands and dogs is one of my favorite petroglyphs.

Green River flowing through Dinosaur National Monument. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

Shadows stretch across the Green River while the evening sun gently bathes the cliffs above in light. Not a bad view from our camp!

Dinosaur bone in cliff at Dinosaur National Monument. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

This large dinosaur bone was sticking out the edge of a cliff.

Lizard petroglyph in Dinosaur National Monument. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

I thought this Native American petroglyph was particularly appropriate for the park.

Elephant Toes rock at Dinosaur National Monument. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

Rock monuments are given names in Dinosaur National Monument, as they are throughout the West. What would you name this? The local answer is below.

Cliff of petroglyphs in Dinosaur National Monument. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

Peggy sits beside a series of petroglyphs we found high above the road.

Petroglyph at Dinosaur National Monument. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

An alien petroglyph?

Dinosaur National Monument. Photo by Curtis Mekemson.

A final scene from our campsite.

The monument was named Elephant Toes. NEXT BLOG: The incredible rocks of Bryce Canyon National Park.

19 comments on “Dinosaur National Monument… A Photographic Journey through America’s National Parks

  1. This is one I really didn’t know anything about. Is that dinosaur bone as big as it looks? Oh, my! And the petroglyphs are wonderful – as are the asters, which I did recognize.

    But I confess – I’m really eager for Bryce Canyon. That’s one of my favorite places in the world.

    • Yes, the dinosaur bone is as big as it looks! I should have used my size 14 shoe as a comparison.

      As for the petroglyphs, they are always fascinating. Peggy and I have a few thousand photographs we have taken from numerous sites. We can only wonder what creates such visions. One can imagine shaman operating under the influence of various psychotropic drugs. Yesterday, I was talking with a member of the Huichol tribe of the Sierra Madre Mountains in Mexico. Much of their incredible art is based upon the use of peyote. I will do a blog in a couple of weeks. –Curt

  2. Such superb, tactile photos. Years ago a local museum lent me a (much smaller) dinosaur bone to take up to the local school where the kids and I constructed our own version of a dinosaur (the museum then took the result and put it temporarily on show). I still remember the wonder of the weight of that bone.

    • Neat idea Hilary… with the kids and the bone. It would have been fun to see the student’s project. And to think as you hold the bone… here is something that was roaming the earth millions of years ago. –Curt

  3. Curt, I’ve been in this area many times and for some reason (or combination of reasons), I still haven’t made it to Dinosaur. Your post makes me want to go even more, and on my next pass through, by god, I’m goin’! For geologists, this place is like Mecca. I took paleontology in college, but most of the fossils we studied were considerably more boring and a long way down the food chain from dinos. In addition to the dinos, it looks like great country as well. The landscape shots are particularly nice. Nice post. ~James

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