Tsunami Ship Becomes Fish Processing Plant… And Other Kodiak Stories

Star of Kodiak fish processing plant in Kodiak, Alaska.

This big ship is parked in downtown Kodiak where it has rested ever since the 1964 Alaska Tsunami tossed it up on shore. It was too big to throw back, so the enterprising residents turned it into a fish processing plant, a fate it has happily pursued ever since.

I don’t know about you, but Peggy and I take lots of photographs. I am sure our trip to Alaska will be in the neighborhood of 3500 if I ever get around to counting them. Darn digital– why take one photo when five will suffice? And then there is sorting, and selecting, and cropping, and making slight color adjustments, and…

Ultimately, even with the most critical selection process, I end up with more than twice as many photos as I can use for a particular blog. Like where in the heck am I going to put the cute picture of the Golden Retriever lying on his back with his long legs stretched everywhere.

Fin is one happy Golden Retriever. This is one of his favorite sleeping poses.

Fin is one happy Golden Retriever. This is one of his favorite sleeping poses. Here he had his eyes open and was wondering if doggy decorum required him to move.

So this is my Kodiak wrap up where I will post some of the photos that got left out. I figure I will use about a third of the ones I’ve chosen. (grin)

Any clue what this is? It's the bone structure of a Grey Whale's head. The Kodiak Wildlife Refuge Museum has the whole skeleton.

Any clue what this is? It’s the head of a grey whale on display at the Kodiak Wildlife Refuge Museum.

Here's the whale before he was buried, dug up and scraped. I assume the process took a strong constitution. The skeleton is quite impressive. We owe the folks who did the job.

Here’s the whale before he was buried, dug up and scraped. I assume the process took a strong constitution. The skeleton is quite impressive. We owe the folks who did the job.

Grey Whales rib cage and hands, oh, I mean fins. Is there any question about a whale's mammal ancestry...

Grey Whales rib cage and hands, oh, I mean fins. It sure appears this guy may have once wandered on land.

Long before Americans made their way into the far north, the Russians were there... and still are, as this Russian Orthodox Church in Kodiak attests to.

Long before Americans made their way into the far north, the Russians were there… and still are, as this Russian Orthodox Church in Kodiak attests to.

Kodiak has a number of great walks and we went on a couple of them between fishing expeditions. We found this shelf fungus on a tree along one of the trails. The locals call it bear bread. We came on another one that had been torn apart. Here Bear!

Kodiak has a number of great walks and we went on a couple of them between fishing expeditions. We found this shelf fungus on a tree along one of the trails. The locals call it bear bread. We came on another one that had been torn apart. Hello Bear!

I found this lake reflection shot along the same trail. Moss covered trees and Devil's Club (the plant) also lined the trail.

I found this lake reflection shot along the same trail. Moss covered trees and Devil’s Club (the plant) also lined the route. You can’t see the thorns on the Devil’s Club, but I guarantee they are there having backpacked through them from time to time during the years I wandered Alaska’s back country.

Yellow pond lilies in Kodiak, Alaska.

Another reflection shot on the same lake captured these yellow pond lilies.

Yellow pond lily flower in Kodiak, Alaska.

Naturally, I had to take a close up of one of the pond lily flowers.

Pushki or Cow Parsnip in Alaska

I’d be remiss if I didn’t include a photo of what the locals called Pushki and I have always called Cow Parsnip. It is one of those plants that mothers are eager to keep their children out of since it can cause serious reactions on some people… including welts.

Another walk to us to the ocean and Pirate Booty Beach, a name our grandkids provided due to the treasures they found there. I considered this seaweed a treasure.

Another walk to us to the ocean and Pirate Booty Beach, a name our grandkids provided due to the treasures they found there. I considered this seaweed a treasure.

And these barnacles.

And these barnacles.

The boys thought these strange metallic sculptures were closer to pirate booty. Decades ago the area had been a dump. The ocean, time and waves had worked their wonders on what had once been cars.

The boys thought these strange metallic sculptures were closer to pirate booty. Decades ago the area had been a dump. The ocean, time and waves had worked their wonders on what had once been cars and other “useful” items.

We all agreed that tide pools contained treasures. Our grandson Connor is reflected in this one.

We all agreed that tide pools contained treasures. Our grandson Connor is reflected in this one.

Grandson Cooper joined us on our walks. I loved the grin. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson.)

Grandson Cooper joined us on our walks. I loved the grin. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson.)

The hard work of hiking and fishing deserves its reward. In this case, it was a soft ice cream cone from McDs, half of which ended up on Chris's face.

The hard work of hiking and fishing deserves its reward. In this case, it was a soft ice cream cone from McDs, half of which ended up on Chris’s face. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson.)

And there's the nap with Chris and Connor... two tired boys.

And there’s the nap with Chris and Connor… two tired boys.

I'll close with this photo of Tony and Cammie with a great thanks to them for making our Kodiak adventure as special as it was.

I’ll close with this photo of Tony and Cammie with a great thanks to them for making our Kodiak adventure as special as it was.

NEXT BLOGS: We will interrupt our Alaska Adventure for a week as Peggy and I prepare for our annual trip to Burning Man in the remote Nevada Desert. The week we are in Burning Man without Internet access, I will pre-post three more Alaska Highway blogs. Afterwards I will share our 2013 Burning Man Adventures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11 comments on “Tsunami Ship Becomes Fish Processing Plant… And Other Kodiak Stories

  1. What a wonderful vacation and thanks for taking us along for the ride.. You have a most beautiful family!!
    Now I eagerly await Burning Man pictures (Oh, you and Peggy, try to keep the fun and excitement to a minimum 😉

    • We arrive home today after six weeks on the road (there will be more Alaska Highway blogs after the Burning Man series). We spent yesterday at Mt. St. Helens, the volcano that blew its top in 1980. The National Park Service has done a great job. I flew over the volcano a few weeks after it blew up and was interested to see what 30 plus years had done to the devastation. –Curt

  2. I love the one of the Orthodox church, and the first reflective photo. They’re all splendid, but I’d be happy with either of those on my wall. You and Peggy both are such wonderful photographers!

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