When Your Campground Goes to the Dogs… North to Alaska

Peggy decided to go kayaking on beautiful Dragon Lake near Quesnel BC for her birthday.

Peggy decided to go kayaking on beautiful Dragon Lake near Quesnel BC to celebrate her birthday.

It was Peggy’s birthday. We picked out a nice campground near Quesnel, BC and declared a layover day. I am expected to celebrate the day appropriately. When we first got married Peggy told me that forgetting her birthday was grounds for divorce. Apparently her first husband missed one…

I’d been careful when leaving home to pack candles, animals, and a hanging birthday sign. “What’s with the animals?” you ask. Peggy’s family has a tradition. Over the years they have gathered dozens of miniature plastic and metal animals. Several of them are placed on the birthday cake. The person having the birthday is then expected to make the sound each animal makes. Like what sound does a hippopotamus make? I’ve been known to leave town on my birthday.

I gathered cards, gifts and a birthday pie along the way. Our friends Bob and Linda joined us and I explained the animals. Peggy then made the necessary growls, grunts, coughs, chest pounds, etc. and had a good time. It appears I am married for another year.

What we didn’t realize was that our campground was about to go to the dogs. Robert’s Roost Campground was hosting dog agility trials. Our campground filled up with dogs of all breeds, shapes and sizes. We went over to watch the action. The dogs are expected to run through tunnels, climb over bridges, weave in and out of a line of sticks, and leap over hurdles in a timed performance. Their owners run along beside shouting instructions. I think the owners work harder than the dogs.

Dog agility trial

A number of hurdles had been set up for the dogs. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

Dog agility trials at Quesnel BC

Hurdles are set at different heights to accommodate dog size.

Dog agility trials at Quesnel BC.

This guy seemed to float over his hurdle. “Jump!” his owner urged. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

Dog agility trials at Quesnel, BC

An even smaller dog weaves his way through the poles. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

Peggy captured the passion this dog was showing.

Peggy captured the passion this dog was showing. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

Dog agility trials at Quesnel, BC

Another shot that captures the intensity of the dogs participating in the agility trials. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

Dog agility trials at Quesnel, BC

Stepping out on the bridge at the dog agility trials.

Another dog challenges the bridge. This time from the opposite direction.

Another dog challenges the bridge. This time from the opposite direction.

Dog agility trials at Quesnel, BC.

Tunnel exit at dog agility trials. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson.)

Bob and Linda's dog, Sister, stands in our shadows and watches the action. Sister decided that much more than "Good dog," would be required for her to leap over hurdles.

Bob and Linda’s dog, Sister, stands in our shadows and watches the action. She decided that much more than “Good dog,” would be required for her to leap over hurdles.

Next Blog: Busy as a beaver on Toad River

12 comments on “When Your Campground Goes to the Dogs… North to Alaska

      • Your site reminds me of my epxerience of living in a 1962 Lincoln Continental for one summer in Minneapolis Mn. I had a house there, but I rented it out. The whole summer was a total adventure. My first day out, I searched for bathrooms and overnight parking. Soon I was parking at night in a commercial/residential area. Picturesque, with tall bushes right beside the car for nighttime #1. No one bothered me at all. My favorite clean up spot was a huge bathroom in the basement of the Van Dyke hotel downtown. It had a side door and I rarely saw anyone in there. I gave out the number of a phone booth that was on the edge of a parking lot right next to Lake Harriet. I would eat deli and fast food meals at a picnic table there and make calls and some days I would get a call or two. I got to explore my own city, which was great, as I found interesting places I had known nothing about. I met a stunning beauty at the Farmers Market, who thought it was hilarious that I was living in my car. We eventually bought a home together. It was already my habit to work a high paying job in the fall. I usually had a choice of short term contract jobs. Having a choice was important becasue I would choose a job that would end around Christmas, because for 40 years, I always went south (usually Mexico)for the winter. Come September I sent out my resume with my phone booth number and the P. O. box that I had gotten months earlier. I monitored the phone booth more closely week days and I soon had an out of town job that paid per diem. That was a great summer and a heck of a lot of fun. I am approaching 70 now and for the last few years, my wife of ten years and I have went to Las Vegas for the winter and lived in a comfortable travel trailer, towed by my pick up truck that burns propane for $2.00 a gallon (2012 price with road tax) for $16 a day that is close to everything. If the need arose, we would have no problem living in an RV. Thank you for letting me tell my story and just as mentioned on Bob’s site, not only was there zero stigma, I was out, living with the people, which is, as I found out, much more natural. Rodney7777

  1. The funniest line of the post: “I’ve been known to leave town on my birthday.”

    The dogs look like they’re having a whee of a time. I smiled all the way through the photos. The tiny one obviously has just as much spirit as the big ones, but they’re all quite handsome.

    I’m not a dog person myself, and neither was my mom, but for some reason it always was critical that we watch the Westminster Dog Show. She loved it, and it was fun to see them put through their paces. Then, just to keep things fair and balanced, we’d watch an episode or two of “The Cat from Hell”.

    • Jonathan is absolutely right about how folks in other cutrelus tend to focus more on relationships than we in America typically do. I knew Jonathan and his wife Debbie (assuming it’s the same Jonathan and Debbie Crocker!) when my wife Mary and I were serving with Wycliffe Bible Translators and living in Long Crendon, England in the late 1980s. I think of the many folks whose paths I’ve crossed over the years among them Jonathan and Debbie but with whom I’m no longer in touch, because I got caught up over time with the pressures of the moment rather than with the people God had brought into my life. Glad I ran across your blog hopefully Mary and I can reconnect with Jonathan and Debbie as a result. Thank you, Mark, for touching the lives of the people of Bulgaria, and for offering a forum for your readers to touch the lives of others as well. I can be reached at rusty dot richards at gmail dot com.

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