The Forum… Where Rome Ruled the (known) World

While much of the Forum today is in rubble, the temple of Antonius  and Faustina still stands proudly.

While much of the Roman Forum is in rubble, the temple of Antonius and Faustina still stands proudly… fortunately. The striations around the columns were caused by someone trying to cut them down.

At the height of the Roman Empire, around 100 AD, Rome ruled from England to the Persian Gulf. The Mediterranean Sea was considered a Roman pond. The Forum, located next to the Colosseum, was the site of Rome’s government. Julius Caesar was killed here on the Ides of March, after which Mark Anthony gave his famous speech: “Friends, Romans and Countrymen, lend me your ears.” We included the Forum as part of a very long walk-about through historic Rome that included stopping by Trevi Fountain, visiting the Pantheon, fighting off pickpockets, and a heck of a lot more. I’m still tired. The following photos are from the Forum.

Archeologists work at the Roman Forum

Excavating the Roman Forum is still very much a work in progress, as this photo shows.

Corinthian Column in Roman Forum

I found the simple elegance of this single column outlined against a cloudy sky to be quite beautiful.

Ruins of Caligula's Palace in the Roman Forum

These columns were once part of Caligula’s Palace. Caligula, who enjoyed torturing people, built his horse a house and planned to appoint him as a Consul. It was around that time that Romans decided to assassinate the infamous emperor.

The building on the lower left, I believe, covers the site where Julius Caesar was assassinated. Above it, to the right, was the Temple of the Vestal Virgins. Their job was to stay chaste for 30 years and attend the eternal flame. Being bad got you buried alive.

The building on the lower left covers the site where the body of Julius Caesar was burned. Above it, to the right, was the Temple of Vesta, attended by the Vestal Virgins. Their job was to stay chaste for 30 years and attend the eternal flame. Being bad got you buried alive. Flings were few and far between. Palatine Hill, where the wealthy lived and cavorted, is in the background. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

The Arch of Titus commemorated the Roman victory over Judaea in 70 AD.

The Arch of Titus commemorated the Roman victory over Judaea in 70 AD. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

While Peggy was capturing photos of important historical sites, I was busy with the local cat.

While Peggy was capturing photos of important historical sites, I was busy with the local cat.

Temple of Constantine in the Roman Forum

What remains of the massive temple of Constantine, the Emperor who made Christianity the official religion of Rome. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

This impressive six-story arch commemorated the victory of the African born emperor Septimius Severus in far off Mesopotamia.

This impressive six-story arch commemorated the victory of the African born emperor Septimius Severus in far off Mesopotamia.

Arches in the Roman Forum

I like this photo of arches that Peggy took. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

Do you think the Latin says park bench? I was tempted.

Do you think the Latin says park bench? I was tempted.

For my last photo, I chose this magnificent boar. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

For my last photo, I chose this magnificent boar. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

NEXT BLOG: We go on a walk-about through Rome and have a run in with pickpockets.

5 comments on “The Forum… Where Rome Ruled the (known) World

  1. I know I could google this but why was Julius Caesar killed? That six-story arch is stunning..wow, besides your legs being tired I bet your eyes were as well for all of this is just amazing..
    I think it does say “Park bench” 😉

    • It is mind boggling… Fortunately photography lets us relive the experience.

      As for Caesar… he was the bridge between the Republic and the Empire… and dictatorship. His assassins thought they were saving the Republic.

  2. Just stunning, no matter how many times I see it — what they did with construction. Can’t fathom seeing it in person!!

    LOVE that kitty profile / portrait! So very sweet.

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