A Bird’s Eye View of Dubrovnik… Sea Ports of the Mediterranean

One of my favorite views into Dubrovnik, this one features the Church of St. Blaise on the left with it's mandatory statue of the saint holding a model of the city.

One of my favorite views into Dubrovnik, this one features the Church of St. Blaise on the right with its statue of the saint holding a model of the city. Note the mechanical bell-ringer in the steeple on the left.

Walking the medieval walls that surround Dubrovnik provides a bird’s eye view across the roofs and down into the city. And what a view it is. Red tile roofs, narrow walkways, and imposing churches invite the visitor to pause and admire the unusual beauty of this town perched on cliffs above the Adriatic Sea.

Twenty years ago most of this beauty was destroyed as Yugoslavia lobbed shells into the city from surrounding hills. Dubrovnik held out, Croatian troops lifted the siege, and the residents proudly rebuilt their city. Today the only reminders of the siege are a few ruins that have yet to be rebuilt and bright red tiles that have yet to mellow with age.

Today’s blog is best reflected through photographs that Peggy and I took. Enjoy.

Looking down on Dubrovnik is like looking down on a sea of red. This photo is taken from Minceta Tower, the highest point on the wall. The Adriatic stretches across the top and the city's port is on the top left.

Looking down on Dubrovnik is like looking down on a sea of red. This photo is taken from Minceta Tower, the highest point on the wall. The Adriatic stretches across the top and the city’s port is on the top left.

This view of red tile roofs and cloudy skies features Dubrovnik's Cathedral on the left.

This view of red tile roofs and cloudy skies features Dubrovnik’s Cathedral on the left. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

The contrast between new and older tiles is captured here. Many of the newer tiles represent repairs made after the Siege of Dubrovnik in 2000-2001. The trellis in the middle covers a garden, of which many are found through out the city nestled between buildings.

The contrast between new and older tiles is captured here. Many of the newer tiles represent repairs made after the siege of Dubrovnik in 2000-2001. The trellis in the middle covers a garden, of which many are found throughout the city nestled between buildings.

Another view of old and newer tiles in Dubrovnik. This one features chimneys.

Another view of old and newer tiles in Dubrovnik. This one features chimneys.

A view looking down on Dubrovnik's port and St. John's fortress that guarded the  harbor against Venetian invasion during the Middle Ages. The towns clock tower is on the right. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

A view looking down on Dubrovnik’s port and St. John’s fortress (now an aquarium and museum) that guarded the harbor against Venetian invasion during the Middle Ages. The town’s clock tower is on the right. Lokrum Island is at the top of the picture. (Photo by Peggy Mekemson)

Peggy's view of an abandoned building.

Peggy’s view of an abandoned building.

My obligatory cat photo from Dubrovnik. I loved the contrast of the two benches that had been shoved together.

My obligatory cat photo from Dubrovnik. I loved the contrast between the cat and the two benches that had been shoved together.

A view down the Stradun, Dubrovnik's main street. The Franciscan Monastery is on the left.

A long view down the Stradun (Dubrovnik’s main street) looking toward the clock tower. The Franciscan Monastery is on the left.

I like this view because it shows what Dubrovnik's red tile roofs look like in the sunlight!

I like this view because it shows what Dubrovnik’s red tile roofs look like in the sunlight!

A final view of Dubrovnik taken from the walls. This photo was shot through a window of one of the city's many guard towers.

A final view of Dubrovnik taken from the walls. This photo was shot through a window of one of the city’s many guard towers.

 

NEXT BLOG: Our tour of Mediterranean Ports  continues as we climb down from the walls surrounding Dubrovnik and walk through the city.

 

 

7 comments on “A Bird’s Eye View of Dubrovnik… Sea Ports of the Mediterranean

  1. Curt (and wife Peggy)… such a wonderful pictorial of a town with heritage. I particularly like Peggy’s shot of the moss laden tiled roof, the photo of the cat and benches and the last shot through a window. But I cringed at reading once again of the destruction of history through war. Indeed, a thousand years from now, I surely hope archaeologists don’t come to a wrong conclusion – that due to reconstruction, a town is only a few centuries old.

      • When in Rome have a blast!! Good on ya for asking the lolacs for directions THAT is how you mix with the culture. I LOVE the smiles on your faces that will make me smile all day ) Have fun take care of each other. Love Mom D

  2. What a wonderful, vigilant city to not let war destroy their history.. I wonder what the economic situation are like for towns such as this..The red tiles are so gorgeous against that sea backdrop.. what a great trip you two had..

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